Current Events

All events are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted.
90 Carlton: Winter
Thursday, Jan. 24, 7 – 9:30 p.m.

The Friends of the Georgia Museum of Art present a quarterly reception featuring the winter exhibitions and previewing “Art Interrupted.” Enjoy gallery talks, light refreshments and live music. Free for members. $5 nonmembers. Call 706.542.4662 for more details.

 


Art Censored Panel Discussion

Saturday, Jan. 26, 2 – 3:30 p.m.

This panel will focus on issues of censorship in conjunction with “Art Interrupted: Advancing American Art and the Politics of Cultural Diplomacy.” Panelists include Dennis Harper, curator, Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art, Auburn University; Richard Neupert, Wheatley Professor of the Arts, department of theatre and film studies, UGA; and Mark White, interim director, Eugene B. Adkins Curator and chief curator, Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art. Paul Manoguerra, director of the Jundt Art Museum, Gonzaga University, and former chief curator, Georgia Museum of Art, will moderate the discussion.

 


Tour at Two: “Art Interrupted: Advancing American Art and the Politics of Cultural Diplomacy”

Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2 p.m.

Led by Laura Valeri, associate curator of European art.


Lecture: Louis Menand, “The Many Lessons of Advancing American Art”

Thursday, Feb. 6, 6 p.m.

Dr. Menand is the author of several books, including “The Metaphysical Club,” which was awarded the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for history and the Francis Parkman Prize from the Society of American Historians. He has contributed to the New Yorker since 1991 and has been a staff writer since 2001. He is currently the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor of English and American Literature and Language, Harvard University. Cosponsored by the Richard B. Russell Library for Political Research and Studies and the Willson Center for Humanities and Arts.


Family Day: Modern Masterpieces

Saturday, Feb. 8, 10 a.m.–noon

Learn about modern art in America during the Cold War in the exhibition “Art Interrupted: Advancing American Art and the Politics of Cultural Diplomacy,” then head down to the Michael and Mary Erlanger Studio Classroom to create your very own modern masterpiece.



Storytelling: Life in the Atomic Age

Wednesday, March 5, 7–9 p.m.

Richard B. Russell Building Special Collections Libraries

Inspired by the storytelling format of the popular radio show This American Life and cosponsored by the Georgia Museum of Art, the Richard B. Russell Library for Political Research and Studies will host an event showcasing selected scholars, community members and archival footage on the theme of life in the Atomic Age. Featured scholars will include Shane Hamilton (department of history), Janice Simon (department of art history) and Mark Reinberger (College of Environment and Design).


Teen Studio: Art Interrupted

Thursday, March 6, 5:30–8:30 p.m.

Teens (ages 13–18) are invited to participate in an art workshop and gallery tour of the exhibition “Art Interrupted: Advancing American Art and the Politics of Cultural Diplomacy.” Led by local artist Hope Hilton, participants will tour and discuss the exhibition and then create their own works of art in response. Pizza will be served. Space is limited. Email callan@uga.edu to reserve a spot.


Artful Conversation: "Art Interrupted"

Wednesday, March 19, 2 p.m.

Join Carissa DiCindio, curator of education, for an in-depth discussion of selected works in the exhibition “Art Interrupted: Advancing American Art and the Politics of Cultural Diplomacy.”


Art Interrupted Film Series: "Notorious"

Thursday, March 20, 7 p.m.

Alfred Hitchcock’s American spy thriller entwines a romantic love story with a suspenseful and intriguing post–World War II espionage operation. Ingrid Bergman plays the American daughter of a convicted Nazi spy. A U.S. agent (Cary Grant) recruits her to spy on Nazis in postwar Rio and, in the process, they fall in love. Also starring Claude Rains. 1946, NR, 101 min.


Art Interrupted Film Series: "Ninotchka"

Thursday, March 27, 7 p.m.

This clever, witty film stars Greta Garbo in her first official American comedy (and her next-to-last film). The lighthearted, satirical story of clashing ideologies (Soviet communism vs. capitalism) begins with Garbo portrayed at first as a humorless, austere Russian envoy who is transformed by Parisian decadence and romance into a frivolous, romantic figure and converted Communist. Directed by Ernst Lubitsch and starring Greta Garbo and Melvyn Douglas. 1939, NR, 110 min.
 

Lecture: Cynthia Schneider

Friday, March 28, 6 p.m.

Ambassador Cynthia Schneider will deliver the keynote speech as part of the Emerging Scholars Symposium: “While Silent, They Speak: Art and Diplomacy,” papers from which will be delivered the following day. A reception will follow.


Emerging Scholars Symposium: “While Silent, They Speak: Art and Diplomacy”

Saturday, March 29

This symposium expands the scope of “Art Interrupted: Advancing American Art and the Politics of Cultural Diplomacy” by addressing the broader theme of diplomacy throughout the history of visual and material culture worldwide. The visual arts can and have been used to promote and facilitate diplomatic agendas across cultures and time, and yet the arts have also challenged or impeded diplomatic efforts. Through the process of crosscultural exchange, an object or image may shift in value and meaning, thereby illuminating, obscuring or reinforcing cultural differences. The keynote address by Ambassador Cynthia Schneider and a reception will take place March 28, and the symposium will be on March 29. Organized by the Association of Graduate Art Students (AGAS) at the University of Georgia, in partnership with the Georgia Museum of Art.

Warning: Creating default object from empty value in /home/interruptedart/artinterrupted.org/components/com_k2/views/itemlist/view.html.php on line 107